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We're all trying so hard not to care, and nobody's benefiting.

Who Has The When it comes to college dating today, guys seem to be in a position of power, calling the shots on sex and romance — partly because they're especially good at playing the who-ever-cares-less game and partly because of the male-dominated places women go to meet straight guys on campus.

I could've told Nate that I thought we had a plan..I was hurt when he ditched me..I was annoyed when he decided to pull away after wrongly assuming I'd wanted to make him my boyfriend. Instead, we ignored each other, knowing that whoever cares less wins.

As my guy friend Parker, 22, explains, "I think people in college are embarrassed to want to be in a relationship, as though wanting commitment makes them some regressive '50s Stepford person.

Between 20, New York University sociologist Paula England, Ph D, conducted an online survey in which she compiled data from more than 20,000 students at 21 colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Her data showed that 61 percent of men hoped a hookup would turn into something more and 68 percent of women hoped for more — almost the same!

In the words of a fellow Harvard girl, "These dweeby Harvard dudes are picking from a group of awesome women.

This creates a sense of competition, making it so that women often go further sexually than they're comfortable with because, you know, 'He could've had anyone.'" My friends on other campuses around the country, especially ones where women outnumber men, agree that guys seem to hold the dating power.

At Harvard, these are the eight all-male social groups called final clubs.

Each club owns a beautiful mansion in Harvard Square, and many of them have existed for a century or more.

We account for 57 percent of college enrollment in the U. and earn 60 percent of bachelor's degrees, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, and this gender gap will continue to increase through 2020, the center predicts.

But I'm still not comfortable with Rosin's assertion that "feminist progress...depends on the existence of hookup culture."The career-focused and hyper-confident types of women upon whom Rosin focuses her argument reappeared in Kate Taylor's July 2013 feature "She Can Play That Game Too." In Taylor's story, female students at Penn speak proudly about the "cost-benefit" analyses and "low-investment costs" of hooking up as compared to being in committed relationships.

But more important, they are known on campus as places where people party on the weekend.

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