Laws for 18 year olds on dating

The announcement of the birth of ‘The Football Association Challenge Cup’ ran to just 29 words: “That it is desirable that a Challenge Cup should be established in connection with the Association for which all clubs belonging to the Association should be invited to compete”. Charles Alcock, then 29, had been The FA’s secretary for just over a year when he had his vision of a national knockout tournament.

He had remembered playing in an inter-house ‘sudden death’ competition during his schooldays at Harrow and his proposal was swiftly agreed.

Ebenezer Morley, a London solicitor who formed Barnes FC in 1862, could be called the ‘father’ of The Association.

He wasn’t a public school man but old boys from several public schools joined his club and there were ‘feverish’ disputes about the way the game should be played.

There could be no authority without laws and six meetings took place in 44 days before the new Association could stand on its own feet. ‘Football’, they thought, would be a blend of handling and dribbling.

Players would be able to handle the ball: a fair catch accompanied by ‘a mark with the heel’ would win a free kick.

Morley wrote to Bell’s Life, a popular newspaper, suggesting that football should have a set of rules in the same way that the MCC had them for cricket.

His letter led to the first historic meeting at the Freemasons' Tavern in Great Queen Street, near to where Holborn tube station is now.

It took place at Hamilton Crescent, the Partick home of the West of Scotland Cricket Club, on 30 November 1872.

The admission fee, as it had been for the first Cup Final, was a shilling.

Civil Service FC are also celebrating their 150th anniversary in 2013.

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