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Type of bill: Restroom and preemption bill What it would have done: This bill would have required transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings according to their birth certificates.

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There wasn’t anything North Carolinians needed to be protected from.

Health care bills: Bills that restrict transgender people’s access to health care ID bills: Bills that limit transgender people’s ability to update their identity documents (like driver’s licenses and birth certificates) Discrimination carve-outs: Bills that allow discrimination against transgender people by creating special exceptions to existing laws Restroom bills: Bills that restrict transgender people’s access to restrooms and other single-sex facilities Preemption bills: Bills that override municipal and county-level anti-discrimination laws School bills: Bills that restrict transgender students’ rights at school Type of bill: Restroom bill What it would have done: This bill would have required businesses, schools, and other public places to either segregate restrooms by gender (which is not defined in the bill) or place attendants at each restroom to monitor people’s restroom use Status: Failed Type of bill: ID bill What would have done: This bill would have made it harder for people in Arizona, including transgender people, to get their name changed by requiring them to provide and pay for the cost of a criminal background check Status: ​Passed in Senate but failed to pass through the House before the end of the legislative session.

Laws aimed at restricting the public bathroom access of transgender people are “untenable,” according to Robin Fretwell Wilson, the Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law and director of the Program in Family Law and Policy at the University of Illinois College of Law. Brian Stauffer Robin Fretwell Wilson is the Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law and director of the Program in Family Law and Policy at the University of Illinois College of Law.

Wilson, who recently helped Utah state lawmakers pass anti-discrimination legislation that balances religious liberty and LGBT rights, spoke with News Bureau business and law editor Phil Ciciora about North Carolina’s controversial new law that limits a transgender person’s bathroom access to the gender listed on their birth certificate. Can it be seen as little more than an election-year stunt to rile up a certain segment of voters?

The North Carolina Legislature could do away with it.

The bottom line is that North Carolina didn’t need to do this.

If courts side with the Department of Education, the choice facing North Carolina will be to follow the rules attached to those funds or forego the funds entirely. And that brings us back to the fight over what Title IX even covers.

North Carolina could argue that it doesn’t believe that the statute says what the federal government and the Obama administration purport it to say.

Ironically, the law is going to end up making the very people who are unnerved by all this social change even more unnerved by trying to hyper-regulate it.

For example, a transgender man – that is, someone born female but who has transitioned to a man – would be forced to use the women’s restroom under this law, when at one time this person would have used the men’s room and no one would have ever paused over it.

How do you enforce public bathroom access based on someone’s birth certificate? The law also covers public universities in North Carolina. The Title IX statute prohibits any sex discrimination by schools receiving certain federal funds, including public schools.

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