Bomb carbon peak dating

The logical conclusion from this was that in order to obtain a modern radiocarbon reference standard, representing the radiocarbon activity of the 'present day', one could not very well use wood which grew in the 1900's since it was affected by this industrial effect.

The effect of this has been to almost double the amount of C14 activity in terrestrial carbon bearing materials (Taylor, 1987).

De Vries (1958) was the first person to identify this 'Atom Bomb' effect.

The volcanic effect has a limited distance however. (1980) found that at 200 m away from the source, plants yielded an age in agreement with that expected.

They suggested that the influence of depleted CO2 declined rapidly with increasing distance from the source.

Because the source of the industrial fuels has been predominantly material of infinite geological age ( e.g coal, petroleum), whose radiocarbon content is nil, the radiocarbon activity of the atmosphere has been lowered in the early part of the 20th century up until the 1950's.

The atmospheric radiocarbon signal has, in effect, been diluted by about 2%.This apparent age of oceanic water is caused both by the delay in exchange rates between atmospheric CO2 and ocean bicarbonate, and the dilution effect caused by the mixing of surface waters with upwelled deep waters which are very old (Mangerud 1972).A reservoir correction must therefore be made to any conventional shell dates to account for this difference.The effect has been suggested as providing dates in error for the eruption of Thera which has been linked to the demise of the Minoan civilisation in the Aegean.One modern plant growing near the emanations had an apparent age of 1390 yr.Reservoir corrections for the world oceans can be found at the Marine Reservoir Correction Database, a searchable database online at Queen's University, Belfast and the University of Washington.

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